The total eclipse of the Moon over a peak of the Continental Divide at the Crowsnest Pass area of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in southwest Alberta, before dawn on the morning of January 31, 2018. The Moon was setting into the west. <br />
<br />
The Moon is just south (left) of the large binocular star cluster, M44, or the Beehive Cluster in Cancer.<br />
<br />
Shortly after this, clouds wafting off the peak engulfed the Moon and I lost sight of it. However, this was at 6:44 am MST, about 20 minutes before the end of totality. <br />
<br />
This was a much publicized Blue Moon and Supermoon eclipse. <br />
<br />
This is a blend of a 15-second exposure for the sky and foreground, and a shorter 1-second exposure for the Moon to prevent its disk from being overexposed, despite it being dim and deep red in totality. Both were at f/2.8 with the 50mm Sigma lens on the Canon 6D MkII at ISO 1600. Untracked, so the stars are trailed.


Searchable keywords

Find the right images by checking multiple keywords below:

  • Alberta
  • Beehive Cluster
  • Blue Moon
  • Crowsnest Pass
  • January 31
  • M44
  • Rockies
  • Rocky Mountains
  • Skies
  • Supermoon
  • TLE
  • Total lunar eclipse
  • astro photography
  • astronomical
  • astronomy
  • biome
  • blood moon
  • boreal
  • boreal forest
  • cancer
  • conifer trees
  • coniferous forest
  • coniferous trees
  • dawn
  • evergreen
  • evergreen forest
  • forest
  • horizontal
  • horizontal format
  • landscape
  • red Moon
  • scenery
  • setting
  • sky
  • sky photography
  • snow forest
  • spruce forest
  • taiga
  • tree
  • trees

Image ID: 0273485-VW-ADY

Red Moon over the Rockies

The total eclipse of the Moon over a peak of the Continental Divide at the Crowsnest Pass area of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in southwest Alberta, before dawn on the morning of January 31, 2018. The Moon was setting into the west.

The Moon is just south (left) of the large binocular star cluster, M44, or the Beehive Cluster in Cancer.

Shortly after this, clouds wafting off the peak engulfed the Moon and I lost sight of it. However, this was at 6:44 am MST, about 20 minutes before the end of totality.

This was a much publicized Blue Moon and Supermoon eclipse.

This is a blend of a 15-second exposure for the sky and foreground, and a shorter 1-second exposure for the Moon to prevent its disk from being overexposed, despite it being dim and deep red in totality. Both were at f/2.8 with the 50mm Sigma lens on the Canon 6D MkII at ISO 1600. Untracked, so the stars are trailed.
Credit to: BluePlanetArchive / VWPics / Alan Dyer

Image dimensions: 5400x3600